Tuesday, August 14, 2018

The New Way

Part 20 of Romans: The Gospel of God

Text: Romans 7:1-6




We serve in the new way of the Spirit and not in the old way of the written code (v. 6). 


Don't Do That!

There’s a local gas station that has signs posted everywhere saying what you can’t do. Signs like that stimulate rebellion within us. People often view the Bible like that—just a list of things we can’t do. To those people, God’s commands hold no appeal.

But the apostle Paul says that we can go from viewing God’s commands as things we must do to viewing them as things we want to do. How does that happen?


Released from the Law

Paul writes, “Or do you not know, brothers—for I am speaking to those who know the law—that the law is binding on a person only as long as he lives?” (v. 1). The “law” is the Mosaic law—the law that was given by God to the people of Israel through Moses at Mount Sinai.

Then Paul presents an analogy in which a married woman is like us (i.e., believers) and her husband is like the law: “For a married woman is bound by law to her husband while he lives, but if her husband dies she is released from the law of marriage” (v. 2). And “if she marries another man she is not an adulteress” (v. 3). [1]

Paul says, “Likewise, my brothers, you also have died to the law” (v. 4). [2] How did this happen? We died to the law “through the body of Christ” (v. 4)—through Christ’s death on the cross. We “now belong to another, to him who has been raised from the dead” (v. 4). “Now we are released from the law, having died to that which held us captive” (v. 6).

What’s the big deal about being “released from the law”?


Going from Under Law to Under Grace

What Paul is saying here goes back to what he said in 6:14: “Sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace.” Let’s trace the history of how we went from being “under law” to being “under grace.” The Bible is broken up into two parts: the Old Testament and the New Testament. “Testament” is another word for “covenant.” A covenant is an agreement between God and man. [3] Being “under law” means living under the old covenant. Being “under grace” means living under the new covenant.

  • God gave the law to Israel and promised, “If you obey my commands, you will be blessed.” (Read Exodus 24:3-8.) The Israelites said, “All the words that the Lord has spoken we will do” (Exod. 24:3). This was the old covenant. Of course, the Israelites failed to do what they said they’d do. 
  • Through the prophets, God promised a new covenant. (Read Jeremiah 31:31-34 and Ezekiel 36:26-27.)
  • The new covenant is based on the blood of Jesus. During the Last Supper, he announced, “This cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood” (Luke 22:20). Under the new covenant, God promises, “If you put your faith in Christ, your will be blessed. Your sins will be forgiven [4]; you will know God [5]; you will give given the Holy Spirit [6]; and you will have my law written on your heart.” [7]

Now “we serve in the new way of the Spirit and not in the old way of the written code” (v. 6). When God changes our hearts by his grace and the Holy Spirit coming to live within us, God’s commands are no longer merely things we must do; God’s commands become things we want to do. Obedience is not to be an external thing (i.e., a demand); obedience is to be an internal thing (i.e., a desire from a changed heart). 


They Shall Be My People

Wayne Grudem states that “at the heart of all of [God’s covenants] is the promise, ‘I will be their God, and they shall be my people.’” [8] God wants us to be with him and to know him. 

In the apostle John’s vision of the heavenly city, God says, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself with be with them as their God” (Rev. 21:3). This promise will be fulfilled because of the blood of Jesus. 

Doesn’t a God like this deserve to be loved with all our hearts? Don’t his wise and good commands deserve to be viewed as things we desire to do, not merely as demands we must do?

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[1] The point of this passage is not to teach about divorce and remarriage. My personal belief is that divorce is permitted in certain situations (Matt. 19:9).
[2] The main point of the analogy is that “one’s relationship to the law is changed when death occurs” (Thomas R. Schreiner, Romans, p. 349).
[3] Wayne Grudem defines a covenant as “an unchangeable, divinely imposes legal agreement between God and man that stipulates the conditions of their relationship” (Systematic Theology, p. 515).
[4] Jeremiah 31:34
[5] Jeremiah 31:34
[6] Ezekiel 36:27
[7] Jeremiah 31:33
[8] Systematic Theology, p. 515.