Monday, July 2, 2018

If Grace Abounds, Why Not Sin?

Part 16 of Romans: The Gospel of God

Text: Romans 6:1-4




What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound? (v. 1). 


Can We Game the System?

In 5:20 the apostle Paul writes, “Where sin increased, grace abounded all the more.” No matter how great our sin is, God’s grace is greater. 

What is God’s grace? God’s grace is the undeserved kindness he shows to us. So far in his letter to the Romans, Paul has talked a lot about something called justification (i.e., being declared righteous by God). Justification is by grace through faith. It’s based on what Christ has done for us—he died for our sins—not on what we have done for God. Justification is given—as a free gift—by God; it’s not earned by us.

In 6:1 Paul brings up a question that is often asked about the gospel: “Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound?” The more sin he forgives, the more gracious he becomes. Why not sin so that God’s grace will look even better?

Athletes often look for ways to “game the system”—exploit the rules to gain an advantage (e.g., fake an injury instead of wasting a timeout). Can God’s grace be exploited? Can we game the system?


How Can We Continue in Sin?

Paul’s answer to the question raised in verse 1 is “By no means!” (v. 2). In other words, of course not! Why not? He says, “How can we who died to sin still live in it?” (v. 2).

To “continue in sin” and “live in it” means to live a lifestyle of sin. Many people think that freedom is living however you want to live—no rules! But that’s not true freedom; it actually ends up being slavery. We live in a free country, but there are laws in Canada. We can't do whatever we want to do. True freedom isn’t lawlessness; it’s the freedom to be what God made us to be.

To “continue in sin” is to exploit God’s grace. How can we—people who have been saved by God’s grace—exploit that grace? We can’t. In other words, we don’t want to do that. Why don’t believers want to exploit God’s grace?

First, we don’t want to exploit God’s grace because we love him. When we do something that insults someone, they might say, “How could you do that?” How can we continue in sin? To want to exploit God’s grace is the ultimate insult to God.

Second, we don’t want to exploit God’s grace because our desires have changed. To “die to sin” means to be freed from the power of sin [1] (“so that we would no longer be enslaved to sin,” v. 6; “sin will have no dominion over you,” v. 14). It doesn’t mean that we’re numb to temptation or that we never sin. It means that “living my own way” no longer has the same appeal.


When Did We "Die to Sin"?

When did we “die to sin”? Look at verses 3 and 4: “Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were buried therefore with him by baptism into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life.”

Paul says that a believer is united with Christ (in his death, burial, and resurrection) through baptism. Is Paul saying that baptism is what makes us a Christian? No, but we must keep in mind that in Paul’s day, a person was baptized immediately after putting his or her faith in Christ (e.g., the Ethiopian eunuch in Acts 8 and the Philippian jailor in Acts 16: “he was baptized at once,” v. 33). It would have been extremely rare to find an unbaptized believer.

Baptism is part of what could be called the “conversion-initiation experience,” [2] which also includes faith, repentance, and the gift of the Holy Spirit. This helps explain Peter’s words in Acts 2:38: “Repent and be baptized everyone one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.”

We Baptists are guilty of de-emphasizing baptism in reaction to those who say a person is saved by baptism. Douglas Moo writes, “I think if Paul had ever been asked about an ‘unbaptized believer,’ he would have responded: ‘Well, yes, such a person is saved, but why in the world isn’t she baptized?’ [3]


What's the Next Step of Faith for You?

 Part of the conversion-initiation experience is being given the Holy Spirit. He transforms our hearts. Because we love God, we want to do his will.

What’s the next step of faith that God wants you to take? Baptism?

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[1] God has freed us from the penalty of sin (i.e., justification). God has freed us from the power of sin (i.e., sanctification). God will free us from the presence of sin (i.e., glorification).
[2] Colin G. Kruse, Paul’s Letter to the Romans, p. 260.
[3] Douglas J. Moo, Romans, p. 206.