Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Reconciled by the Death of God's Son

Part 14 of Romans: The Gospel of God

Text: Romans 5:6-11




But God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us (v. 8). 


Saved from What?

Normally when Christians talk about being “saved,” they’re talking about a past event. (“When were you saved?”) But in Romans 5, the apostle Paul says believers will be saved (future tense).

What do we—those of us who have put our faith in Christ—hope to be saved from? When you’re in a swimming pool and you yell “Help!” to the lifeguard, you want to be saved from drowning. When you’re in a burning building and you yell “Help!” to a firefighter, you want to be saved from the fire. The kind of salvation that Paul is talking about is salvation from hell and God’s wrath.

There are a lot of people who would like to get rid of hell and God’s wrath. (“If God is a God of love, how can he send people to hell?”) But if you get rid of hell and God’s wrath, what you end up with is a less loving God. How can that be true?


Reconciliation

Notice how Paul describes us: “weak” (v. 6), “ungodly” (v. 6), “sinners” (v. 8), and “enemies” (v. 10). In other words, humanity is guilty before God and hostile toward God. We need justification (because of our guilt before God) and reconciliation (because of our hostility toward God).

God longs for people to be reconciled to him. God is like the father in the story of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32). When the son finally comes to his senses and returns home, his father sees him while he’s “still a long way off” —which implies that the father has been waiting for his son to return. As the father has been waiting, has he been planning how he’ll punish his son? No, he’s been longing for reconciliation. He runs to meet his son. He receives him back. He celebrates. Jesus said, “There is joy [a celebration!] before the angels of God over one sinner who repents” (Luke 15:10).


The Cost of Reconciliation

To what degree does God long for us to experience reconciliation with him? The answer is found in the words “Christ died for us” (v. 8). The cross shows us how much God loves us (“sinners,” v. 8) and desires reconciliation between us and him (“God shows his love for us,” v. 8). (Don’t make the mistake of thinking that it was easier for God to give up his Son than it would be for us to give up our child.)

What’s your reaction to the story of the prodigal son? Maybe your reaction is “He didn’t deserve to be welcome back by his father!” That’s the point.

We are no more deserving.


In My Place Condemned He Stood

The night before Jesus was crucified, he prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me” (Matt. 26:39). What was the “cup”? In the OT, God’s wrath is sometimes described as a cup (“the cup of his wrath,” Isa. 51:17). Christ dying for us meant that the God’s wrath was poured out on him. This is why if we get rid of hell and wrath that God is made less loving.

From the cross, Jesus cried out, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matt. 27:46). Jesus faced God’s wrath so that we could be reconciled. We are “reconciled by the death of his Son” (v. 10).

Because of what God has already done for us, we can be sure that we will be “saved” (vv. 9, 10).