Monday, May 28, 2018

The Trinity: A Model for the Church

Part 2 of Jesus, Continued...

Text: Genesis 1:26-27




“But when the Helper comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of Truth, who proceeds from the Father, he will bear witness about me” (John 15:26). 


The Trinity 

Imagine reading a murder mystery, getting to the part where you’re told who “did it,” but discover-ing that the rest of the pages are missing. You know who did it, but you don’t exactly know how they did it. Trying to understand the Trinity is sort of like that.

The Bible clearly states that there is only one God: “The LORD [i.e., Yahweh] our God, the LORD is one” (Deut. 6:4). But Yahweh exists as three Persons: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

God is three distinct Persons. He is not successively Father, Son, and Holy Spirit (Sabellianism); he is simultaneously Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Otherwise, how would we make sense of the baptism of Jesus?

God is three equal Persons. The Son is not inferior to the Father (Arianism). Yes, Jesus did say, “The Father is greater than I” (John 14:28). But what he meant was that the Father is greater in authority. Jesus also said, “I and the Father are one” (John 10:28). He meant that he and the Father are one God.
Can we completely understand the Trinity? No. But the fact that we can’t completely understand the Trinity doesn’t mean it’s not true. The fact that my three-year-old daughter can’t understand gravity doesn’t make it not true.


Made in God's Image

In the story of creation in Genesis 1, God repeatedly says, “Let there be.” But in verse 26, he says, “Let us make.” Many theologians believe that “us” is the first hint of the Trinity in the Bible. “Let us make” what? “Let us [the triune God] make man in our image, after our likeness.”

We—humans, both male and female—have been made to be like God. Are we like the Trinity? God existed eternally as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Jesus prayed to the Father, “You loved me before the creation of the world” (John 17:24). God was never alone. Before he made the woman, God said, “It is not good that the man should be alone” (Gen. 2:18). We were made to not be alone; we were made to be like the Trinity—to enjoy relationships. 


A Model for the Church

The three Persons of the Trinity, though they are equal, are different from each other. In John 15:26 we see all three persons of the Trinity: “When the Helper comes, whom I [Jesus] will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of Truth, who proceeds from the Father, he will bear witness about me.”

In the Trinity, there is unity and diversity. The Persons of the Trinity have different roles, but they work together in perfect harmony.

In the Trinity, there is authority and submission. The Father is first in authority, the Son is second, and the Spirit is third. It’s the Father and the Son who send the Spirit, not the other way around. Yet all three Persons are equal. Authority isn’t superiority. In the Trinity, there is no jealousy or resentment.

The Trinity is a model for all of our relationships, including our relationships with one another in this church. A church should be like the Trinity in two ways.

1. A church should exhibit both unity and diversity. 

Jesus prayed, “May they be one, even as we are one” (John 17:11). Are we one? In every church, there is diversity, but is there unity? Romans 3:23 says, “All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” The “glory of God” is the image (likeness) of God. When you take our differences and then add to it our sinfulness, you often get disunity—which is not God-likeness.

We have also been given diverse gifts (abilities) from the Holy Spirit. “There are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone” (1 Cor. 4:6). We are to work together in harmony (like the Trinity does), not unison.

2. A church should embrace both authority and submission. 

Our culture despises authority. Why? Because we are sinners who want to be in charge of our own lives. The attitudes in a church should be different from the attitudes in the world. Have you ever thought that to submit to authority is to act like God? We can be like God both by how we lead and how we submit.

The apostle Paul writes, “The head of Christ is God” (1 Cor. 11:3). Jesus declared, “I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will but the will of him who sent me” (John 6:38). Hours before he was to be crucified, Jesus prayed, “Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me. Nevertheless, not my will, but yours, be done” (Luke 22:42). The relationship of authority and submission between the Father and the Son works because of their love for each other.

[Read Philippians 2:1-11.] How awful does our selfish ambition and conceit look when compared to the Son’s submission to the Father culminating in his crucifixion? Are we reflecting the image of God in our church?