Monday, February 19, 2018

Why Is God So Angry?

Part 5 of Romans: The Gospel of God

Text: Romans 1:24-32




Therefore God gave them up in the lusts of their hearts to impurity, to the dishonoring of their bodies among themselves, because they exchanged the truth about God for a lie and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator (vv. 24-25). 


A Foolish Exchange

People have made a foolish exchange. They have exchanged the Creator for created things (v. 25), thinking that these things can make them happy. C. S. Lewis writes,
Creatures are not born with desires unless satisfaction for those desires exists. A baby feels hunger well, there is such a thing as food. A duckling wants to swim: well, there is such a thing as water. Men feel sexual desire: well, there is such a thing as sex. If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world (Mere Christianity, 134-135). 
We were made to know God. And if we never find him, our search for happiness will end in disappointment.

God “gave them up” (vv. 24, 26, 28). He allowed them to do what they wanted to do. The result was “all manner of unrighteousness” (v. 29).


God's Anger

Verse 18 says, “The wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men.” Why is God so angry?

When we hear the word “wrath,” we often think of someone who has an anger issue (i.e., someone with a short fuse). But God doesn’t have a short fuse. In Exodus 34:6, God proclaims to Moses that he is “a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.” God is slow to anger.

God’s wrath is his righteous anger (i.e., a right kind of anger) over all sin. God is angry only when it’s right to be angry. There are times when anger is right (i.e., appropriate, fitting) and indifference is wrong. It’s right to be angry when an evil act is committed (e.g., this week’s school shooting in Florida). We get angry because we care. “Unrighteousness” (i.e., sin, breaking God’s commands—not loving God and others) makes God angry because he cares about us. Sin hurts either us or others. 

When an evil act is committed, we also desire justice. But God gains no pleasure out of punishing people for their sin. “As I live, declares the LORD GOD, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but that the wicked turn from his way and live; turn back, turn back from your evil ways, for why will you die, O house of Israel?” (Ezek. 33:11). Jesus “wept over” (Luke 19:41) the city of Jerusalem and said, “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not!” (Matt. 23:37).

God will not overlook any sin, but he wants to forgive every sin. He is “patient toward [us], not wishing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance” (2 Peter 3:9). The cross proves to us both the awfulness of sin in the eyes of God (if he could overlook sin, why did Jesus die for our sin?) and the love of God for us.


Homosexuality 

The apostle Paul singles out one sin: homosexuality. Why? Probably the phrase “contrary to nature” (v. 26) is the key to answering that question. Paul began by talking about mankind suppressing the truth about God, which is contrary to nature. Belief in God is natural (i.e., we’re hardwired to believe in God). So then Paul points out a sin (homosexuality) that is unnatural (i.e., not what God intended for mankind).

We live in a culture in which anything is acceptable between two consenting adults. But God made us male and female. And God made sex. And sex is only to be enjoyed by a man and a woman who are married to each other. (However it isn’t a sin to be attracted to the same sex.)

It’s imperative that we maintain a balance between biblical conviction and Christlike compassion. If you say to a gay person, “I love you, but I can’t accept your lifestyle,” they’ll say, “But this is who I am!” You probably won’t convince them with your words, so just show them love. 


Don't Forget About the Other Sins

Let’s not overlook the other sins mentioned in this passage. Gossip is a sin that angers God (v. 29). Instead of praying for a person’s problems, the gossiper would rather talk about their problems. Instead of saying a kind word to that person, the gossiper would rather criticize them behind their backs.

Don’t say anything negative about someone that you wouldn’t say to them. And when you hear gossip, ask the person, “Have you spoken to them about this concern you have?” God hates gossip. It hurts people, and it can destroy the unity of a church.