Monday, January 15, 2018

Keeping Your Resolution to Pray

Part 2 of What's Your Resolution?

Text: 1 John 5:13-15




And this is the confidence that we have toward him, that if we ask anything according to his will he hears us. And if we know that he hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests that we have asked of him (1 John 5:14-15). 


Don't Ditch Your Resolution!

This is the time of year when people are trying to keep New Year’s resolutions. Two of the most common Christian resolutions are to read the Bible daily and to pray daily.

Did you know that January 17 has been named Ditch Your Resolutions Day? Why? Probably be-cause it only takes about two months into a new year to feel like ditching our resolution. Resolutions are hard to keep: 50% of people make New Year’s resolutions, but 88% of those resolutions ultimately fail. How can we keep our resolution to pray daily?


Direct Access to God

When you call to make an appointment with your doctor, you don’t speak to your doctor. You speak to your doctor’s receptionist. And you almost never get to see your doctor immediately. You have to make an appointment to see your doctor on a future day. Then when that day finally arrives and you go to your doctor’s office, you have to sit in a waiting room and wait.

It’s very different when we want to meet with God. “Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need” (Heb. 4:16). “The eyes of the Lord are on the righteous, and his ears are attentive to their cry” (Ps. 34:15). We have direct access to God!


Keeping Our Resolution

If we are to keep our resolution to pray daily, we should remember five things. First, when we pray, we should remember that it’s normal to be frustrated with prayer. There are many biblical examples of people who were frustrated with prayer. One of these people was the prophet Habakkuk. The book of Habakkuk begins with the prophet complaining to God about unanswered prayer: “O LORD, how long shall I cry for help, and you will not hear? Or cry to you, ‘Violence!’ and you will not save?” (Hab. 1:2). Sometimes it’s encouraging to discover that other people struggle like us. (We’re not happy about the struggles of others, but we are happy to know we’re not abnormal.)

Second, when we pray, we should remember that we’re approaching a Father who loves us. Throughout 1 John, John emphasizes that believers are God’s children (“born of God”). In 3:1, he writes, “See what kind of love the Father has given to us, that we should be called children of God.” God is a Father who loves his children more than we can imagine. Because we know God loves us, we can have “confidence” (v. 14) when we pray.

Third, when we pray, we should remember that prayer really does work. But prayer is not a waste of time. It’s possible that when we pray we can “have the requests that we have asked of him” (v. 15). Of course, this doesn’t mean that we can make God do things he doesn’t want to do.

Fourth, when we pray, we should remember that prayer isn’t all about us. Prayer is about getting God’s will done, not ours (“if we ask anything according to his will,” v. 14). We should also pray for the needs of others, not just our own needs (see v. 16).

Fifth, before we pray, we should have a plan. Instead of saying to ourselves, “I want to pray daily,” we should make a specific plan. An ideal plan would be to combine Bible reading and prayer. Here’s one possible plan: (1) set aside 20 minutes; (2) pick a quiet time and place; (3) read a portion of Scripture; (4) meditate upon the words you have read; (5) ask God to speak to you through those words; (6) pray.


An Appointment with God

I’m sure most of us have a few appointments on our calendars for this month: an appointment to see your doctor, an appointment to get your car repaired, an appointment to have coffee with a friend. We do our best not to miss our appointments.

We have an each day appointment to meet with God—to hear his voice through his word and speak to him through prayer. But many of us miss that appointment. This is nothing new. Martin Luther—who lived 500 years ago—wrote a letter to his barber about how to pray. In the letter he said this:
It is a good thing to let prayer be the first business of the morning and the last at night. Guard yourself carefully against those false, deluding ideas which tell you, “Wait a little while. I will pray in an hour; first I must attend to this or that.” Such thoughts get you away from prayer into other affairs which so hold your attention and involve you that nothing comes of prayer for that day. [1]
Think about the incredible privilege it is to meet with God each day. And what’s most amazing is that he is “always more ready to hear than we [are] to pray.” [2]

If you struggle with taking time to pray, my purpose is not to make you feel guilty about your lack of prayer. My purpose is to encourage you—starting today—to make sure you keep your daily appointment with God.

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[1] Martin Luther, A Simple Way to Pray.
[2] Book of Common Prayer.