Monday, November 6, 2017

The Priority of the Gospel

Part 8 of The Gospel Gone Viral

Text: Acts 20:17-38




“Pay careful attention to yourselves and to all the flock, in which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers, to care for the church of God, which he obtained with his own blood” (20:28). 


What Matters Most?

What should matter most to a church?

In Acts 20:17-38, Paul speaks to the elders of the church of Ephesus. The elders are the leaders of a church. In verse 28, we find two responsibilities of an elder: (1) to oversee the church (“in which the Holy Spirit as made you overseers”) and (2) to care [1] for (i.e., shepherd ) the church (“care for the church of God”). [2]

In 1 Peter 5, the apostle Peter addresses another group of elders, and he mentions the same two elder responsibilities:
So I exhort the elders among you…: shepherd the flock of God that is among you, exercising oversight, not under compulsion, but willingly, as God would have you; not for shameful gain, but eagerly; not domineering over those in your charge, but being examples to the flock. And when the Chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the unfading crown of glory (vv. 1-4). 
If elders are to effectively shepherd and oversee the church, they need to know the correct answer to the question “What should matter most to a church?”


The Gospel

The thing that should matter most to the church is the gospel. Why? There is nothing people need more than the gospel.

  • Paul describes the gospel as “the gospel of the grace of God” (v. 24). Since we are saved by grace, God deserves all the glory for our salvation.
  • The gospel tells us that we matter to God. Jesus “obtained [the church of God] with his own blood” (v. 28).
  • People accept the gospel (and are saved) by repenting (i.e., turning from sin) and believing (i.e., turning to Jesus): “repentance toward God and faith in our Lord Jesus Christ” (v. 21). Repentance and faith are two sides of the same coin. 
  • The gospel is not just for the beginning of the Christian life. Believing in the gospel is sort of like learning the alphabet. That’s the first thing you learn when you go to school, and knowing the alphabet is something that’s incredibly helpful throughout your whole life. We don’t forget about the alphabet once we finish grade 1. And we shouldn’t forget about the gospel after we put our faith in Christ. The gospel inspires us to do the right thing. For example, Ephesians 4:32 says, “Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.” 

What We Need to Do with the Gospel

Since there is nothing people need more than the gospel, we must do two things. First, we must proclaim the gospel. Paul says, “I am innocent of the blood of all, for I did not shrink from declaring to you the whole counsel of God” (vv. 26-27). Why would we “shrink” from declaring “the whole counsel of God”? Because parts of it offend people. They don’t want to hear the reason why they need the gospel: they are sinners who deserve condemnation, not salvation.

Second, we must preserve the gospel. Paul warns them, “After my departure fierce wolves will coming in among you, not sparing the flock; and from among your own selves will arise men speaking twisted things, to draw away disciples after them” (vv. 29-30). “Be alert” (v. 31), Paul says. People who want to draw a church away from the gospel could come from outside the church (v. 29) or inside the church (v. 30).


What Are We if We Don't Have the Gospel?

As we saw in verse 28, one of the responsibilities of church elders is to provide pastoral care. When we think of pastoral care, what do we normally thing of? The best way to care for the flock is to make sure the church doesn’t lose the gospel because all of the comfort and encouragement we have to share is based on the gospel.

What is a church if it doesn’t have the gospel? It’s merely a charity that does good deeds. But the gospel changes lives. There is nothing people need more than the gospel, so we must (1) proclaim it and (2) preserve it.

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[1] To “care” for the church means to “shepherd” the church, which is called “the flock” (v. 28; 1 Peter 5:2).
[2] In the New Testament, elder, pastor, and overseer are three titles for the same office.