Monday, November 13, 2017

The Father's Love

Part 1 of Two Lost Sons

Text: Luke 15:11-32




But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and felt compassion, and ran and embraced him and kissed him (Luke 15:20). 


A Story About a Father's Two Sons

In the Gospels, Jesus tells many stories. One of his most popular stories is the story of the Prodigal Son. The title is a bit misleading because it’s not a story about just one son; it’s a story about two sons. And it’s also a story about a father whose heart is full of love for his sons.

In the story, the younger son is a rebellious son who leaves home and breaks his father’s heart. The older son remains home and appears to be the good son, but he also breaks his father’s heart.


The Story's Purpose

Why did Jesus tell this story? [1] To answer this question, we need to go back to the first three verses of Luke 15.
Now the tax collectors and sinners were all drawing near to hear [Jesus]. And the Pharisees and the scribes grumbled, saying, “This man receives sinners and eats with them.” 
So he told them this parable…. [2]
The story was told to the Pharisees and scribes—religious leaders. The Pharisees and scribes had “grumbled” because the tax collectors and sinners were “drawing near” to Jesus, and he was welcoming them—even eating with them.

The tax collectors and sinners were non-religious people. They were like the younger brother. The Pharisees and scribes were self-righteous people. They were like the older brother who angrily complained when his father—who represents God—had welcomed back the rebellious son.

The purpose of the story of the Prodigal Son is to teach two truths: First, God welcomes all repentant sinners. What happened when the younger son returned home? “While he was still a long way off, his father saw him and felt compassion, and ran and embrace him and kissed him” (v. 20). Tim Keller writes, “It’s not the repentance that causes the father’s love, but rather the reverse. The father’s lavish affection makes the son’s expression of remorse far easier.” [3]

Second, some people who think they’re on the “inside” are actually on the “outside.” On a different occasion, Jesus said to some other religious leaders, “The tax collectors and the prostitutes go into the kingdom of God before you” (Matt. 21:31). The religious leaders thought they were on the “inside,” but they were actually on the “outside.” When the story ends, it’s the younger son who’s inside the father’s house, not the older son (v. 28). Both sons are invited into the feast, but only the younger son enters. The older son’s pride keeps him out. “Good” people don’t go to heaven. Only repentant sinners go to heaven.


The Prodigal God

Tim Keller’s book on the story of the Prodigal Son has an unusual title: The Prodigal God. Here’s Keller’s explanation of the title:
The word “prodigal” does not mean “wayward” but, according to Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, “recklessly spendthrift.” It means to spend until you have nothing left. This terms is therefore as appropriate for describing the father in the story as his younger son. The father’s welcome to the repentant son was literally reckless, because he refused to “reckon” or count his sin against him or demand payment. This response offended the elder brother and most likely the local community. 
In this story the father represents the Heavenly Father Jesus knew so well. St. Paul writes: “God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself, not reckoning to them their trespasses” (2 Corinthians 5:19—American Standard Version). Jesus is showing us the God of Great Expenditure, who is nothing if not prodigal toward us, his children. [4]
How did God the Father make reconciliation possible through Christ? Second Corinthians 5 goes on to day, “For our sake [God] made [Jesus] to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God” (2 Cor. 5:21). God sent his own Son into a “far country” to die so that we could be reconciled to him. God was willing to endure the sorrow of losing his own Son so that he could know the joy of welcoming us back home.


Imitate the Father

Many churchgoers are like the older brother—like the Pharisees and scribes. They see themselves as better than other people, more deserving of a place in God’s family. We are to be like the father—like God. We are to have compassionate hearts.

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[1] The stories of Jesus are called “parables.” A parable is a fictional story told to teach a truth.
[2] Jesus told three parables: the parable of the lost sheep, the parable of the lost coin, and the parable of the lost son. In each parable, something is lost. And in each parable, there is joy when what was lost is finally found.
[3] Timothy Keller, The Prodigal God, 74.
[4] Ibid., xiv-xv.