Tuesday, October 17, 2017

God Saves Lost Causes

Part 5 of The Gospel Gone Viral

Text: Acts 9:1-19; 1 Timothy 1:12-17




But I received mercy for this reason, that in me, as the foremost [of sinners], Jesus Christ might display his perfect patience as an example to those who were to believe in him for eternal life (1 Tim. 1:16). 


A Lost Cause?

Do you know someone whose conversion to faith in Jesus appears to be a lost cause? Maybe that person is a husband or wife, a son or a daughter, or a good friend. It seems like they will never accept the gospel. Maybe you think that you’re that kind of person—that there’s nothing that could happen that would ever cause you to give your life to Jesus.

The book of Acts tells the story of a person just like that. His conversion appeared to be a lost cause. He was the last person anyone expected to become a follower of Jesus. Yet by the grace of God that’s exactly what happened.


The Persecutor Becomes an Apostle

Saul (also known as Paul) was someone who hated the gospel. He desperately wanted to stop the spread of the gospel—so much so that he became a persecutor of the church. He was present at the stoning of Stephen (Acts 7:58) and “approved of his execution” (Acts 8:1). And he “was ravaging [i.e., destroying] the church” (Acts 8:3). “Entering house after house, he dragged off men and women and committed them to prison” (Acts 8:3).

In Acts 9, Saul is traveling to Damascus to arrest followers of Jesus. But on his way to Damascus, he meets Jesus and is converted. In Saul’s retelling of the story of his conversion in Acts 26, Jesus says to Saul, “It is hard for you to kick against the goads” (Acts 26:14). A goad was a sharp stick used to prod oxen (i.e., to get them moving in the right direction). Saul had been resisting the gospel (like an stubborn ox kicking against the goads ). But God can save anyone—even a person who appears to be incredibly resistant to the gospel.

Saul the persecutor—this lost cause—became an apostle. The one who had once wanted to destroy the church ended up doing more to spread the gospel than perhaps any other person in history.


The Grace of God

In 1 Timothy 1, Saul describes himself as the “foremost” (i.e., worst) of sinners: “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the foremost” (1 Tim. 1:15). Saul understood that he had been saved by grace (i.e., undeserved kindness) alone. He felt like he was the person most unworthy to be saved. He says that “the grace of our Lord overflowed for me” (1 Tim. 1:14).

Everyone—not just people like Saul—needs to be saved by grace. Can you identify with Saul when he said, “I am the foremost [of sinners]”? Perhaps he was a worse sinner than you and me, but we should all sense our sinfulness and our unworthiness to be saved. Why did Saul go on to do so much for God?

In 1 Corinthians 15, he writes,
I am the least of the apostles, unworthy to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was not in vain. On the contrary, I worked harder than any of them, though it was not I, but the grace of God that is with me (vv. 9-10). 
Jesus once said, “He who is forgiven little, loves little” (Luke 7:47). We could also say, “He who is forgiven much, loves much.” Saul was willing to do much for God because he knew he had been forgiven much by God. Do you profess to be a Christian but lack the willingness to do much for God? Maybe it’s because you don’t see yourself as being forgiven much by God.


Why Did God Save Saul?

Why did God save Saul? Saul says, “I received mercy for this reason, that in me, as the foremost, Jesus Christ might display his perfect patience as an example to those who were to believe in him for eternal life” (1 Tim. 1:16).

Saul’s conversion was so unexpected that the believers in Jerusalem didn’t believe he really was a believer: “They were afraid of him, for they did not believe that he was a disciple” (Acts 9:26). Saul was converted in order to give hope to everyone who longs to see the salvation of a “lost cause.”

No one is beyond the grace of God. So don’t give up on that person you think might be a lost cause. Don’t stop praying. They might be “kicking against the goads,” but the Holy Spirit can work in that person’s life to bring about change. And don’t stop looking for opportunities to share the gospel.


How About You?

Maybe you’re someone who has been resistant to the gospel. You’re not a lost cause. Jesus said, “Whoever comes to me I will never cast out” (John 6:37). No matter what we’ve done in the past, Jesus will accept us.