Monday, October 9, 2017

Despising the Shame

Part 4 of The Gospel Gone Viral

Text: Acts 5:37-42





Then they left the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were counted worthy to suffer dishonor for the name (v. 41). 


Thankful for Suffering?

One popular Thanksgiving tradition is to ask people what they’re thankful for. You might do this before your Thanksgiving dinner. Each person around the table takes a turn saying what he or she is thankful for. We expect to hear people say they’re thankful for blessings such as family, health, freedom, and salvation (if the person is a Christian). We probably don’t expect to hear someone say they’re thankful for suffering. But that’s what the apostles did in Acts 5.

The apostles had been arrested for sharing the gospel with the people of Jerusalem. They were beaten and ordered not to talk about Jesus anymore. But they didn’t stop talking about Jesus. And they didn’t become discouraged. Instead, “they left the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were counted worthy to suffer dishonor for the name [i.e., the name of Jesus]” (v. 41). If you’re rejoicing about something, you’re thankful for it. Why were the apostles thankful for suffering dishonour for the name of Jesus?


Suffering Shame for Jesus

The apostles had suffered “dishonor” (i.e., disgrace, shame). Since the apostles had been beaten (v. 40), the public would have seen them as criminals (i.e., they suffered shame). Why were the apostles thankful for this? The apostles weren’t thankful merely because they were suffering. They were thankful because they were suffering for Jesus. Jesus was the one who had told them, “You will be my witnesses” (Acts 1:8). The apostles were willing—even thankful!—to endure shame for Jesus because he had done the same for them. 

Hebrews 12:2 says that Jesus “endured the cross, despising the shame.” When we think of crucifixion, usually the first thing that comes to mind is the pain of crucifixion. The word “excruciating” means “a pain like the pain of crucifixion.” Crucifixion was literally torture. But crucifixion was also dreaded because of its shame. “To die by crucifixion was to plumb the lowest depths of disgrace; it was a punishment reserved for those who were deemed most unfit to live” (F. F. Bruce, The Epistle to the Hebrews, 338). Crucifixion was carried out in a public place. While Jesus hung on the cross, he was naked for all to see. And he was mercilessly mocked by his enemies.


Despising the Shame

Jesus “endured the cross, despising the shame.” What does “despising the shame” mean? The Greek word that has been translated “despising” (kataphroneo) means “to look down on.” When a person looks down on someone, they are thinking that the person is of little value. When Jesus “despised” the shame of the cross, it was as if he was saying, “Shame, you are nothing to me.” How could he say that?

Hebrews 12:2 says, “Who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame.” What was this joy? Hebrews 12:2 goes on to say that Jesus is now “seated at the right hand of the throne of God.” He was not thinking of only himself when he thought of this joy. He was also thinking of us. He died on a cross so that we could experience the joy of heaven with him! Jesus said, “Shame, you are nothing to me compared to the joy of knowing that many people will be saved because of my death on this cross.”

For us, Jesus endured crucifixion. Therefore we can say, “Shame, you are nothing to me compared to the joy of obeying Jesus.”