Monday, September 18, 2017

How It All Began

Part 1 of The Gospel Gone Viral

Text: Acts 1:1-11




“You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth” (v. 8). 


Gone Viral

Up until the last few years, when you heard the word “viral” you probably thought of a viral infection (e.g., the common cold). But now when you hear the word “viral” you might think instead of a viral video. A viral video is a video that quickly gets millions of views by people sharing it with others on the Internet.

In the beginning of the book of Acts, only a handful of people are aware of the gospel. But at the end of the book, thousands of people have heard and believed the gospel. The gospel went viral. How? By people simply sharing it with others.


Jesus Is Alive!

The Acts of the Apostles is a sequel to the Gospel of Luke. Luke states that in his “first book” (i.e., the Gospel of Luke) he wrote about what “Jesus began to do and teach” (v. 1). Now in the book of Acts Luke will tell us about what Jesus continued to do and teach through the apostles.

Luke writes that during the time between the resurrection and ascension of Jesus, Jesus “presented himself alive to [the apostles]…by many proofs” (v. 3). The apostles were convinced that the gospel was true. Jesus had died for their sins and had risen from the grave! All who put their trust in Jesus will be saved!


Sharing the Gospel

Jesus says to the apostles, “You will be my witnesses” (v. 8; cf. Isa. 49:6). A witness is someone who tells others what he/she has seen. The apostles were witnesses in a unique sense. Unlike us, they had seen Jesus before and after his death and resurrection.

  • “This Jesus God raised up, and of that we are all witnesses” (2:32). 
  • “You killed the Author of Life, whom God raised from the dead. To this we are witnesses” (3:15). 
  • “We cannot but speak of what we have seen and heard” (4:20). 
  • “God raised [Jesus] on the third day and made him to appear, not to all the people but to us who had been chosen by God as witnesses, who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead” (10:40-41). 
Does this mean that v. 8 doesn’t apply to us today? No, all who receive the testimony of the apostles all become witnesses. We haven’t seen the risen Jesus, but we have seen what the gospel has done in our own lives. 

Many of us have probably heard the saying, “Preach the gospel. Use words if necessary.” But the truth is that people need to hear (or read) words in order to be saved. Justin Taylor has said, “The Good News can no more be communicated by deeds than can the nightly news.” That’s not to say that how we live is unimportant. It’s incredibly important. (And we’ll see this as we go through Acts.) But the fact remains that being a witness requires a person to use words.


To the End of the Earth

Jesus tells the apostles that they are to be witnesses “in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth” (v. 8). Verse 8 could be used as a table of contents for the books of Acts. It begins with a few witnesses in Jerusalem, and by the end of the book the gospel is taken all the way to Rome. And it eventually reached us!

Though they lived in a different time and culture, the apostles and the other followers of Jesus in Acts were people like us. They struggled with fear like we do. There is no valid excuse for not sharing the gospel. (Keep in mind that most of the believers in Acts did not speak to large crowds like Peter and Paul did.)

Wherever we are and whomever we’re with, we should look for opportunities to share the gospel. But not every moment should be considered an opportunity to share the gospel. Ecclesiastes 3:7 says that there is “a time to keep silence, and a time to speak.” There is a time to speak up and share the gospel, and there is a time to keep silent and pray. We need boldness, but we also need wisdom.


In the Meantime

“As [the apostles] were looking on, [Jesus] was lifted up, and a cloud took him out of their sight” (v. 9). “While they were gazing into heaven” (v. 10), two angels two angels said to the apostles, “This Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven” (v. 11).

Earlier the apostles had wanted to know when the kingdom of God would come to earth: “Lord, will you at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” (v. 6). But Jesus told them that this wasn’t for them to know: “It is not for you to know times or seasons that the Father has fixed by his own authority” (v. 7). Too many Christians spend more time speculating about when Jesus might return than thinking about how they might share the gospel with a friend.

We are living in the time between two great events: the ascension and the second coming. Jesus went up to heaven, and one day he’ll return. In the meantime, we have are to his witnesses. We are to share with others what God has done for us—and what he can do for anyone—through the death and resurrection of Jesus.