Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Faith in the Furnace

Part 3 of Our God Reigns

Text: Daniel 3:1-30




“If this be so, our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace, and he will deliver us out of your hand. But if not, be it known to you, O king, that we will not serve your gods or worship the golden image you have set up” (vv. 17-18).


If

One of my favourite October traditions is watching It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown. In the Halloween special, Linus desperately wants a visit from the Great Pumpkin. According to Linus, “The Great Pumpkin rises out of his pumpkin patch and flies through the air with his bag of toys for children.”

When all of the children abandon Linus in the pumpkin patch on Halloween night, he tells them, “If the Great Pumpkin comes, I’ll still put in a good word for you.” Then he catches himself. “Good grief! I said ‘if.’ I meant ‘when he comes’! I’m doomed. One little slip like that can cause the Great Pumpkin to pass you by.” Linus believed that the sincerity of his faith could cause the Great Pumpkin to visit him. [1] Like Linus, many Christians think that the quality of their faith can cause God to do what they desire. [2]

In Daniel 3, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego aren’t afraid to say the word “if.” [3] They want God to save them from death in the fiery furnace, but they concede that it’s possible that God might not do for them what they desire. Biblical faith is not confidence in what I think should happen; it’s confidence in God. [4]


No Compromise

King Nebuchadnezzar sets up a golden image [5] and commands that everyone bow down to it. [6] Whoever does not bow down to the image will be thrown into a fiery furnace. When the music plays, everyone bows down, except three young Jews: Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego.

Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego’s disobedience doesn’t not go unnoticed. They are brought before Nebuchadnezzar who gives them one last chance to obey. He warns them that if they once again refuse to bow down to the image, they will be thrown into the fiery furnace. And then he adds, “Who is the god who will deliver you out of my hand?” (v. 15).

Bowing down to the image would be a violation of the second commandment: “You shall not bow down to [an image]” (Exod. 20:5). When we are faced with the decision of obeying God or obeying man, we must choose to obey God. [7] Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego refuse to back down. To the most powerful man on earth, they reply,
“O Nebuchadnezzar, we have no need to answer you in this matter. If this be so, our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace, and he will deliver us out of your hand. But if not, be it known to you, O king, that we will not serve your gods or worship the golden image you have set up” (vv. 17-18). 
They believe that God is “able to deliver [them],” but they also acknowledge that God might not choose to do so (“But if not”). They will obey God even if the outcome is death.


God Is with Us

Nebuchadnezzar, “filled with fury” (v. 19), orders the furnace to be heated seven times hotter than usual. Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego are bound and thrown into the fire. The king looks into the furnace. He looks again. He stands up and walks closer to the furnace. Maybe his eyes are playing tricks on him. Finally, he asks, “Did we not cast three men bound into the fire?” (v. 24). His counselors answer, “Yes.” “But,” Nebuchadnezzar says, “I see four men unbound, walking in the midst of the fire, and they are not hurt; and the appearance of the fourth is like a son of the gods” (v. 25). The king shouts into the furnace, “Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, servants of the Most High God, come out, and come here!” (v. 26). The three walk out, unharmed.

Who was the fourth figure in the furnace? It was either a Christophany (i.e., a physical appearance of Jesus before his incarnation ) [8] or an angel. Either way, the fourth figure was a demonstration that God is always with his people. [9]


Sometimes God's People Aren't Delivered

Hebrews 11 is often called “The Hall of Faith.” The chapter mentions Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego (and also Daniel): “who through faith conquered kingdoms, enforced justice, obtained promises, stopped the mouth of lions, quenched the power of fire” (Heb. 11:33-34).

If we have faith in God, do we always get the outcome we desire? No. Hebrews 11 goes on to say, “Some were tortured, refusing to accept release, so that they might rise again to a better life. Others suffered mocking and flogging, and even chains and imprisonment. They were stoned, they were sawn in two, they were killed with the sword” (Heb. 11:35-37). When we don’t get the outcome we desire, does that mean our faith is defective? No.


Who Is This God Who Is with Us?

The God who is always with us is a God who is sovereign (i.e., in control of all things). He is “the Most High God” (v. 26). He is a God who is able to deliver people from a fiery furnace, if he so chooses. We can have confidence in God because he is not only a sovereign God; he is also a good God. God’s sovereignty must be paired with his goodness. Unless God is also good, his sovereignty isn’t a comfort to us.

We see both God’s sovereignty and goodness in the cross. Jesus came into this word as Immanuel, which means, “God with us.” Like Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, Jesus was condemned to die. But unlike Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, Jesus was not delivered from death. He was crucified because God is sovereign; it was God’s plan that he die. [10] He was crucified because God is good; he died for our sins.

Biblical faith is not confidence in what I think should happen; it’s confidence in God—a God who is both sovereign and good, a God who is always with us.

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[1] Linus says to himself, “He’s gotta pick this one. He’s got to. I don’t see how a pumpkin patch could be more sincere than this one.”
[2] For example, “If I pray hard enough, God will heal me.”
[3] See verse 18.
[4] This is a paraphrase of a point made by Bryan Chapell: “Biblical faith is not confidence in particular outcomes; it is confidence in a sovereign God” (The Gospel According to Daniel, Kindle location 918).
[5] In verses 1-18, we’re told nine times that Nebuchadnezzar “set up” the golden image. Nebuchadnezzar probably builds the golden image because of his dream of a great image in Daniel 2: “you are the head of gold” (v. 38).
[6] This account is similar to the story of the Tower of Babel, which was built so that the builders could “make a name for [themselves]” (Gen. 11:4).
[7] See Acts 5:29.
[8] ESV Study Bible, 1592.
[9] Cf. Isaiah 43:2.
[10] “This Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men” (Acts 2:23).