Monday, September 8, 2014

Money

Part 5 of Wise Steps, a series on Proverbs

Text: Proverbs 30:7-9

(Sorry, there is no audio available for this sermon.)



Give me neither poverty or riches; feed me with the food that is needful for me, lest I be full and deny you and say, “Who is the Lord?” or lest I be poor and steal and profane the name of my God (Prov. 30:8b-9).


In Money We Trust

Most people know that the phrase “IN GOD WE TRUST” is written on American coins. But many Canadians aren’t aware that God is also mentioned on Canadian coins. Next to the Queen’s image the phrase “D. G. REGINA” can be found. This is a Latin phrase. The letters “D. G.” stand for dei gratia, and dei gratia regina means “Queen by the grace of God.”

It’s ironic that both American and Canadian coins mention God. Why? Because North Americans, in their day-to-day living, generally don’t trust in God (even if they identify themselves as Christians); they trust in money.


The Root of All Evil? 

Is money the root of all evil? No, the Bible doesn’t say that money is the root of all evil. It says, “The love of money is a root of all kinds of evils” (1 Tim. 6:10). Money is morally neutral; it’s neither good nor evil. Anthony Selvaggio writes, “The moral issues regarding wealth arise entirely from how we acquire it, relate to it, and use it. In other words, the problem is us.” [1]

Money isn’t everything, but it is a blessing from God.

The book of Proverbs talks about money in a positive way. Proverbs 10:22 says, “The blessing of the LORD makes rich.” [2] We must avoid extremes in our view of money. Money isn’t everything, but it’s not nothing. [3]


What Should We Do with Our Money?

What should we do with the blessing of money?

1. We shouldn’t make money our God. 

Is it wrong to work hard and make money? No. But we need to be careful that we don’t make money our idol. Tim Keller defines an idol as “anything more important to you than God, any-thing that absorbs your heart and imagination more than God, anything you seek to give you what only God can give.” [4] Charles Spurgeon once said,
I believe that it is anti-Christian and unholy for any Christian to live with the object of accumulating wealth. You will say, “Are we not to strive all we can to get all the money we can?” You may do so. I cannot doubt but what, in so doing, you may do service to the cause of God. But what I said was that to live with the object of accumulating wealth is anti-Christian. [5]
In Agur’s prayer, he asked for neither riches nor poverty. He prayed, “Feed me with the food that is needful for me, lest I be full and deny you and say, ‘Who is the LORD?’ or lest I be poor and steal and profane the name of my God” (Prov. 30:8-9). [6] It’s not sinful to be rich or poor, but Agur didn’t want the temptations that come with riches (“lest I be full and deny you”) and poverty (“lest I be poor and steal”).

The apostle Paul wrote about people who had “wandered away from the faith” because of their “love of money”:
But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils. It is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs (1 Tim. 6:9-10). 
People who love money forget about God (“Who is the LORD?”). Agur was more concerned about honouring God than how much wealth he possessed.

J. D. Rockefeller was at one time the world’s richest man. Someone once asked him, “How much money is enough?” Rockefeller answered, “Just a little bit more.” Immanuel Kant once said, “Give a man everything he wants and at that moment, everything will not be everything.” If make money our god, we will end up being disappointed. Only God can fill the emptiness that’s within us. Jesus warned about “the deceitfulness of riches” (Matt. 13:22). It won’t deliver what people think it will.

2. We should be generous with our money. 

When God blesses us with money, we are to bless others by being generous. Proverbs 19:17 says, “Whoever is generous to the poor lends to the LORD, and he will repay him for his deed.” Jesus is the ultimate example of generosity. Paul wrote to the Corinthians, “You know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you by his poverty might become rich” (2 Cor. 8:9). When Paul wrote these words, he was raising money to give to needy believers in Jerusalem.

3. We should be content with our money. 

More money doesn’t guarantee a better life. [7] Proverbs 15:16-17 says, “Better is a little with the fear of the LORD than great treasure and trouble with it. Better is a dinner of herbs where love is than a fattened ox and hatred with it.” Paul wrote to Timothy,
Now there is great gain in godliness with contentment, for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world. But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content (1 Tim. 6:6-8). 

True Wealth 

Who is the wealthiest person on earth? Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook)? According to Forbes magazine, Zuckerberg is the world’s fourteenth wealthiest person ($34 billion). Warren Buffet? Buffet is the world’s third wealthiest person ($67.6 billion). Bill Gates (Microsoft)? Gates is the world’s second wealthiest person ($81.2 billion).

Does money make a person wealthy? It depends on how you define the word “wealthy.” One definition of “wealthy” is “characterized by abundance.” At the end of the movie It’s a Wonderful Life, George Bailey (played by Jimmy Stewart) reads a card from Clarence (his guardian angel). The card reads, “Dear George, remember no man is a failure who has friends.” George had many friends because he was a generous man. In the final scene, George’s brother Harry raises a glass and says, “A toast to my big brother George: the richest man in town.”

A wealthy person can be poor, and a poor person can be wealthy. A person can be wealthy no matter how much money he or she has. Generosity and contentment enrich our lives. Many rich people aren’t generous or content, so they lack love and happiness.

Whether a Christian has been blessed with lots of money or not, he or she is “rich” (2 Cor. 8:9) because of Christ. That’s true wealth.


[1] Anthony Selvaggio, A Proverbs Driven Life (Kindle edition), location 1021.
[2] “Prosperity gospel” teachers often misuse a verse like this to claim that every Christian can receive material riches in this life.
[3] Proverbs 3:14 says that wisdom is more valuable than money: “the gain from her is better than gain from silver and her profit better than gold.”
[4] Timothy Keller, Counterfeit Gods, xvii.
[5] 2,200 Quotations from the Writings of Charles H. Spurgeon, 216.
[6] There are a few similarities between Agur’s prayer and “The Lord’s Prayer” (Matt. 6:9-13). In both prayers there are requests for daily food, for protection from temptation, and for God’s name to be sanctified.
[7] There are some problems that the rich encounter that the poor don’t. For example, Proverbs 13:8 says, “The ran-som of a man’s life is his wealth, but a poor man hears no threat.”